National News

Cold-formed steel construction performs better than expected in seismic tests

Engineering researchers have provided the building blocks necessary for enabling performance-based design for cold-formed steel buildings, structures that have shown in shake-test experiments at the State University of New York at Buffalo to withstand seismic loading much better than previously expected.

Talk focuses on ways to rebuild in quake-prone New Zealand region

Researchers studying methods to increase the resilience of structures built on earthquake-prone soils in New Zealand will discuss the methods during a national conference next week.

Earthquake engineering conference to highlight remotely installed pipe liners for earthquake-resistant pipelines

Earthquake-engineering researchers are meeting this month to discuss methods for improving the nation’s seismic safety, including the security of critical underground lifelines such as water and wastewater pipelines.

Purdue-led NEES joins earthquake engineers, industry leaders for conference, marking 50th anniversary of historic Alaska quake

Engineers, scientists, industry leaders, public policy experts, emergency responders, government agency officials and others will spend five days here in July to highlight advancements in earthquake damage mitigation and mark the 50th anniversary of the historic Alaskan quake that took 131 lives and caused $300 million in damage.

Conference talks focus on quake-vulnerable wood-frame buildings

Earthquake engineering researchers are meeting this month with policy experts to discuss efforts to improve the seismic safety of low-rise, wood-frame buildings - those no taller than four stories - which may have a "soft story" condition making them vulnerable to collapse even during a moderate earthquake.

Earthquake researchers get online primer for simulation method

Researchers from around the world now have access to expert instruction for an emerging simulation method to study seismic effects on structures and to design buildings that better withstand strong earthquakes.

New bridge design improves earthquake resistance, reduces damage and speeds construction

Researchers have developed a new design for the framework of columns and beams that support bridges, called 'bents,' to improve performance for better resistance to earthquakes, less damage and faster on-site construction.

N.Y. high school student partners with Iowa State researchers in NEES project, wins awards

An Iowa State University professor and graduate student developed a research partnership with a student from a top U.S. high school.

NEES-led research projects to be featured at NSF's USA Science Engineering Festival

Two interactive exhibits highlighting research activities through the Purdue University-led George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) will be featured this weekend at the USA Science Engineering Festival in Washington, D.C.

Ground-improvement methods might protect against earthquakes

Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin's Cockrell School of Engineering are developing ground-improvement methods to help increase the resilience of homes and low-rise structures built on top of soils prone to liquefaction during strong earthquakes.

Study identifies quake-prone concrete buildings in Los Angeles area

Researchers in the National Science Foundation's George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) have identified concrete buildings constructed before roughly 1980 in the Los Angeles area. This category of buildings, sometimes referred to as nonductile concrete buildings, is known from experience in previous earthquakes to have the potential for catastrophic collapse during strong earthquakes.

NEES-led data integration project aimed at exposing U.S. quake data to researchers in Europe, elsewhere globally

Researchers and software developers at the Purdue-led George E. Brown Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) are building a data integration system that will allow seamless sharing of experimental data with earthquake engineers globally.

New database system could aid research in science, engineering

Researchers at Purdue University have developed a system that makes it easier to collect, share, explore and re-use data related to the impacts of earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes and floods.

NEES@UC San Diego shake table wins Best of What's New award from Popular Science

The biggest outdoor shake table in the world has received a Best of What's New award from Popular Science, the world's largest science and technology magazine. The project is featured in the magazine's December issue, now on newsstands.

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